Adjectives comparing unequal quantities | English Grammar | EF

Adjectives comparing unequal quantities

To compare two things that are unequal, we use the pattern:

adjective indicating quantity + (noun) + than

The quantity adjective you use depends if the noun in the comparison is countable or uncountable.

Countable nouns

Use more and fewer with countable nouns. Note that the noun may be ommitted when it is understood from the context, as in the last example below.

Examples
  • They have more children than we do.
  • We have more customers than they do.
  • Tom has fewer books than Jane.
  • There are fewer houses in his village than in mine.
  • You know more people than I do.
  • I have visited the States more times than he has.
  • I have three brothers. That's more than you have. ("brothers" is understood)
Uncountable nouns

Use more or less with uncountable nouns. Note that the noun may be omitted when it is understood from the context, as in the last example below.

Examples
  • John eats more food than Peter.
  • Jim has less patience than Sam.
  • You've heard more news than I have.
  • He's had more success than his brother has.
  • They've got less water than we have.
  • I'm not hungry at all. I've had more than I want. ("food" is understood)